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Campus Life - Comments from Past International Students

Wei-Chen Yang (Taiwanese)

Wei-Chen Yang
Q How did you become interested in Japan?
A My father was a captain working for the Taiwanese shipping company Evergreen Marine Corp., and ever since I was a child he would bring me gifts from different countries. My favorite gifts were things like stationery and sweets from Japan. I’ve loved Japanese comics ever since I was in junior high school, and I was infatuated with Japanese boy bands, too. I’ve always wanted to go to Japan. So, after I graduated from high school, I asked for my parents’ permission to study abroad in Japan.
Q Out of the choices that you had, why did you choose to enroll in the Takushoku University Intensive Japanese Language Program for Overseas Students?
A After I decided to study abroad in Japan, a friend of my father’s introduced me to someone who had been to Takushoku University. That person told me all about Japan and Takushoku University. My father had another friend who became a guarantor for me, and that person also recommended Takushoku University, so I decided to enroll in the university’s Intensive Japanese Language Program for Overseas Students.
Q Why did you decide to proceed from the Intensive Japanese Language Program for Overseas Students to the Department of Political Science in Takushoku’s Faculty of Political Science and Economics?
A I came to study in Japan so that I could learn more about the country. While I was in the Intensive Japanese Language Program for Overseas Students, I looked into the courses each faculty offered and discovered that the Department of Political Science offers courses in Japanese political history, Japanese economic history, international relations and international economics. I joined the department because I decided the above courses would help me learn not only about Japan, but also about how Japan sees international affairs.
Q What do you feel that you have learned and gained at Takushoku University?
A Of course I gained specialized knowledge in my major, but I would also say that one experience that had a major influence on me was living in the Seiwa Dormitory, which is a dormitory for women. At the time, Seiwa Dormitory residents were housed two to a room, so everyone had a roommate. That meant that I lived in a space of about ten square meters with someone whose culture and living habits were completely different from my own. We fought sometimes, but I ended up making a lifelong friend whom I still keep in touch with. At the time, Seiwa Dormitory didn’t have many residents. Everyone got along very well, and since I was an international student, living there provided me with an excellent opportunity to learn Japanese and learn about different Japanese regional cultures.
In my second year at the dormitory, I was chosen to be the dormitory leader. On the inside, I didn’t feel like I was up to the task, but the encouragement of the other second-year students gave me the confidence to try my best. Becoming dormitory leader made me confident that I could do something if I set my mind to it and also taught me about leadership.
Q Please explain why you decided to proceed to graduate school (the Graduate School of Economics) and what the theme of your graduate research was.
A I proceeded to graduate school because I wanted to be a university professor. I knew from the beginning that I wanted to get a doctorate, not just a master’s degree. That’s why I enrolled in the seminar of Professor Tsuchiana, who has two doctorates. My master’s thesis involved research into Taiwan’s national health insurance program. My doctoral thesis involved research into welfare policy in an aging society.
Q Please explain why you chose your current occupation.
A This is my dream job. It is simple. My mother was a kindergarten teacher, and when I was in kindergarten, my dream was to become a kindergarten teacher. When I entered elementary school, I changed my mind and decided that I wanted to be an elementary school teacher. Then when I went to middle school, I thought about becoming a middle school teacher. In high school, I started dreaming a little bigger and decided that I wanted to become the principal of a high school. After studying abroad in Japan and getting my PhD, I decided to become a university professor.
Q What kind of influence did Takushoku University have on you, Professor Yang? What do you feel that you have now thanks to enrolling in Takushoku University?
A After I joined my current university, I led a student team in an innovation and startup contest. Not only did the team compete with other Taiwanese universities and become national champions, it also won the contest’s worldwide competition and became world champions. I believe that because I enrolled in Takushoku University and lived in the Seiwa Dormitory contributed significantly to my ability to train this team of world champions.
Takushoku University didn’t just provide me with specialized knowledge. I was also able to learn about Japanese circumstances and culture. Living in Seiwa Dormitory gave me the opportunity to make Japanese friends, and becoming dormitory leader helped me gain confidence in myself and taught me how to lead others. Takushoku University has many international students from a variety of different countries. Even though they come from different countries, they interact with each other frequently, and I believe that they broaden each other’s international perspectives.
The ten years I spent at Takushoku University have had a tremendous influence on my life, and I truly believe that I owe who I am today to the fact that I enrolled there. When I was in my second year, I wrote a greeting to the incoming students as a representative of the Takushoku student body. I said, “I am proud to be a student of Takushoku University, and one day, I will be the pride of Takushoku University.” I still remember those words I wrote, and I will continue striving to be the pride of Takushoku University.
Name:
Wei-Chen Yang
Nationality:
Taiwanese
Background:
  • April 1990—Enrolled in the Takushoku University Intensive Japanese Language Program for Overseas Students
  • March 1991—Completed the Takushoku University Intensive Japanese Language Program for Overseas Students
  • April 1991—Enrolled in the Department of Political Science in the Takushoku University Faculty of Political Science and Economics
  • March 1995—Graduated from the Department of Political Science in the Takushoku University Faculty of Political Science and Economics
  • April 1995—Enrolled in the master’s program of the Takushoku University Graduate School of Economics
  • March 1997—Completed the master’s program of the Takushoku University Graduate School of Economics
  • April 1997—Enrolled in the doctoral program of the Takushoku University Graduate School of Economics
  • March 2000—Completed the doctoral program of the Takushoku University Graduate School of Economics without obtaining a degree
  • March 2001—Earned a PhD from the Takushoku University Graduate School of Economics
  • August 2000—Became a lecturer in the Department of International Business of the Southern Taiwan University of Science and Technology
  • August 2001—Became an assistant professor in the Department of International Business of the Southern Taiwan University of Science and Technology

Madaminov Sokhib (Uzbekistan)

Madaminov Sokhib
Q How did you become interested in Japan?
A I had been studying the Japanese language, and at first I just wanted to visit. Since coming to Japan, however, I’ve really fallen in love with the country.
Q You enrolled in the Department of Japanese Language at the Tashkent State Institute of Oriental Studies, located in the city of Tashkent in your home country of Uzbekistan. You completed a one-year study-abroad program at the University of Tsukuba during your sophomore year, and later decided to come back to Japan. Why did you select Takushoku University?
A I chose Takushoku because I heard that it has a Department of International Business, as well as a large international student body and a beautiful campus.
Q What was college life like for you at Takushoku University?
A I had a very fulfilling college life. In particular, I learned a lot from interactions with my professors.
Q Why did you want to work for a Japanese company?
A I felt that Japanese companies have a promising future.
Q What kind of work are you doing now?
A I’m a manager of a convenience store.
Q Tell me about your goals for the future.
A I’d like to introduce convenience stores to Uzbekistan or Russia.
Q What kind of influence has Takushoku University had on you? What are some things you felt were possible because you enrolled in Takushoku University?
A Thanks to Takushoku University, I’ve become comfortable living in Tokyo, made a lot of friends, and found a job at a major convenience store through the university’s great job-hunting support.
Q What message do you have for those thinking about studying abroad?
A Before studying abroad, it would be helpful to focus on studying the Japanese language while still in your home country.

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